Author: Regina Jimenez

  • Babies’ Language Development Month By Month

    Anyone who thinks that a baby’s life is all about eating, sleeping and dirtying diapers is wrong. It is in the first year of life that he acquires many behaviors and develops complex skills, and for this reason, they are encouraged to play, say goodbye and walk, for example. But what about language , what to expect at this age? Does it come on suddenly or do we need to do something to help them speak?

    First, it is very important to know the stages of language development and at what ages they should take place. Since the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, the fetus already has a developing auditory system and can hear body noises and the mother’s voice. During this period, the aspects of melody (intonation), timbre (frequency) and accent are already beginning to be distinguished by the baby, who, in the first hours of life after birth, already recognizes and changes his crying and sucking behaviors when hearing the voice of own mother. And that is where I say: although it is not the speech itself, there are already signs of linguistic development.

    To the delight of the daddies, in a continuous flow, the baby is smarter every day! Are we going to the conquests of the little ones?

    Development milestones

    • At 3 or 4 months of age: the baby vocalizes meaningless sounds and just for fun, without the intention of communicating;
    • Between 06-09 months: The vocalizations give way to babbling – “papa”, “mama”, “auau” – And sounds that children produce with communicative intent. That is, whenever he wants his mother he tends to say “mama”;
    • Around 12 months: The first words “for real” appear and the child becomes a “parrot”, repeating and singing everything he hears!
    • Up to 18 months: It is expected that the vocabulary will be expanded many times and that babies will begin to express their needs.
    • At 24 months : Many two-word phrases such as “I want tetê” or “Ana (herself) to sleep” are part of the speech, even though they are still said with omissions and distortions of speech sounds.